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Pokémon GO creators serve cease and desist order to third party hack developer

By Chong Jinn Wei - on 7 Aug 2016, 7:00am

Pokémon GO creators serve cease and desist order to third party hack developer

Since Pokémon GO is finally available in Malaysia, people are busy trying to catch whatever the can. However, the game's creators want to encourage users to play fairly.

The developers of Pokémon GO are serving up lawsuits against developers who have created hacks for cheating in the game. Niantic and The Pokémon Company have sent a cease and desist letter to an independent developer for breaking the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act (CFAA).

Image source: Android Central

"Your actions ... potentially violate the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act, a statute that prohibits the unauthorized access of servers and access which exceeds authorization as well as similar state statues…And your inducement of others to violate numerous terms of service provisions violates the CFAA," the letter reads.

The independent developer in question, Mila432, had designed an application programming interface (API) that can automate play. In other words, Mila432 found a way to get bots to automatically play the game without the need of physical input.

Mila432 had since uploaded the API to GitHub where it has been downloaded more than 2,250 times. The Pokémon Company has stated that the API in question has violated the terms of use that govern how users interact with its servers and game.

If the independent developer does not comply with the company demands, they may be subject to legal action. However, is it not known if the game company can actually charge the developer since there has been no material harm done.

Following this, Niantic has started restricting how similar third party APIs interact with Pokémon GO. This has affected many popular Pokémon tracking apps used by players to locate different Pokémon around the area. John Hanke, CEO, Niantic, believes this a necessary step to ensure the servers are not strained and encourage fair play amongst players.

Source: The Verge