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Tabagotchi Chrome browser virtual pet motivates you to keep only a few tabs open
By Ian Chee - on 12 Sep 2017, 12:06pm

Tabagotchi Chrome browser virtual pet motivates you to keep only a few tabs open

Image source: Tabagotchi.

In all likelihood, you’re probably using Google Chrome as your default browser on your PC desktop or notebook. If so, then you’ll also know that it hogs a lot of RAM, as it keeps each open tab as an individual process to keep a crash isolated on one of them, instead of it killing the whole browser. This can cause problems if you have the bad habit of leaving a lot of them open, and your system doesn’t have a lot of RAM to work with. Your entire system then slows to a crawl, or worse, becomes outright unresponsive and crashes. If you have problems dealing with tab management on your Chrome browser, then perhaps having it tied to an artificial life form could help you deal with this better.

Image source: Tabagotchi.

Tabagotchi is a Chrome browser extension that adds a virtual pet to the browser that you don’t actually need to feed, groom or care after. All you need to do keep the number of tabs open to a minimum, as each new tab opened reduces its health meter by four percent. If you do the math, this means that having 25 tabs or more open would spell doom for your browser virtual pet.

All this is, of course, assuming that you care about a virtual pet that you don’t actually need to provide care for. We don’t speak for everyone, but we’d reckon that the reason people leave a ton of tabs open is because they don’t trust themselves to remember what’s been bookmarked since they’re not within immediate view. We also suspect that this fact would outweigh keeping a browser virtual pet alive, but if it doesn’t, then this could be a fun way to help rein in your tab addiction.

There is an added feature to up the fun factor on the extension: for every 10 nonconsecutive hours that you spend with your Chrome browser having five or fewer tabs, your Tabagotchi evolves, and it looks like there are two stages of evolution available.

We’re also surprised that Bandai is letting the obvious name reference slide, but maybe that speaks a lot of good for the company.

Source: Tabagotchi via Gizmodo.